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NRAS Property in Victoria

NRAS Property in Victoria

The National Rental Affordability Scheme (NRAS) is a long term commitment by the Australian Government to invest in affordable rental housing. The NRAS Victoria seeks to address the shortage of affordable rental housing by offering financial incentives to the business sector and community organizations to build and rent dwellings to low and moderate income households at 20 per cent below-market rates for 10 years. NRAS Victoria aims to increase the supply of new affordable rental housing; reduce rental costs for low and moderate income households; and encourage large scale investment and innovative delivery of affordable housing. The Australian Government has committed $1 billion to the Scheme over four years to stimulate construction of up to 50,000 high quality homes and apartments, providing affordable private rental properties for Australians and their families.

NRAS Victoria is a great opportunity for property investors to have a property investment in Victoria in a high capital growth area but still receive the positive cash flow provided by the generous government grants. I believe this is a small window of opportunity where a property investor can build their asset base with no need to take a hit on their cash flow, in actual fact you will increase your cash flow position. NRAS Victoria offers a substantial annual tax-free incentive, the NRAS Incentive, for every dwelling built under its auspices. Investors making property investment in Victoria need to apply for NRAS Incentives, and if offered, must agree to rent approved dwellings at 20 per cent or more below current market rates, to low and moderate income households.

The NRAS Incentive is a funding stream not available to standard residential property investors. Each approved dwelling attracts the NRAS Incentive for 10 years, so long as investors continue to comply with conditions around tenant eligibility and rent discounts. NRAS investors can expect to benefit from the annual NRAS Incentive, rental yields and capital gain. NRAS is intended to be a commercial, profitable property investment in Victoria for participants, while also assisting Australia to increase the supply of affordable housing. It is important to understand that an NRAS approved property is physically no different to any other property in a new development – it simply has been granted the NRAS status. Taxation or any government incentive should never entirely drive a property investment Victoria decision – sure – take them into consideration, but the underlying qualities of the investment are always the most important drivers.

The same applies for NRAS property investments in Victoria – if the NRAS scheme was not there tomorrow, would the investment still make sense? The real benefit of investing in an NRAS Victoria property compared to a normal property investment in Victoria comes down to maths. The $9,524 government incentives are a flat annual amount – regardless of the property type, value and rental income. This means the incentives have a larger positive cash flow impact on properties with a lower market rent. NRAS property investments in Victoria can boost the amount of cash flow generated from a property – which is fantastic.…

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Reporting Stock Shares on Schedule D

Reporting Stock Shares on Schedule D

Schedule is a tax form that you attach to your 1040 income tax return; it is used to report capital gains. The form itself is easy to understand, but the filing can become complicated when multiple transactions occur with a single equity.

Stock sales can be reported based on the actual value of specific shares or on a first in, first out (FIFO) basis. Investors can report capital gains in such a manner as to offset other gains or losses. Schedule D reports on stock sales, not current holdings.

The description of stock shares is entered on Line 1 (a) of Schedule D. List the number of shares and then, the name of the company.

The purchase and sale dates of the shares are entered on Line 1 (b) and 1 (c). If you do not have this information on hand, it can be obtained from the 1099 provided from your broker or by your broker upon request.

Enter the sale price of the stock shares on Line 1 (d). This amount is either the cost per share or the gross proceeds from the sale.

The cost basis of the stock is entered on Line 1 (e). This is the most complicated calculation of the process. You can get detailed information on calculating cost basis from the IRS at their website.

Subtract the figure on Line 1 (e) from the figure on Line 1 (d) to determine your capital gain. If you end up with a negative number, it is a loss as opposed to a gain. Losses are reported in (parenthesis). This amount, gain or loss, is to be entered on Line 1 (f).

Repeat the process for each stock sold. While sales in a single company can be aggregated onto a single entry, you must list every company in which you have sold stock during the year on Schedule D.

The example given above is for reporting on short-term assets. To report on long-term assets, follow the same process, but enter the numbers in the fields on Line 8 rather than Line 1.

If you sold shares in a single company, some of which were short-term assets and some of which were long-term, it will be necessary to separate and report these assets based upon duration.…

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Integrating Financial Education Into The Education System – Part 2

Integrating Financial Education Into The Education System – Part 2

Given the various flaws in the education system, many people become more vulnerable to bad financial advice. As a result, financial problems occur and this causes them to gain financial wisdom the hard way. Since prevention is better than cure, it is definitely better if we wire in sound financial concepts into students before they step into the outside world. The following single lesson below is one I deem extremely important for students to know, adding on to the 3 addressed in Part 1.

One vital lesson the education system ought to have is the difference between capital gains and cash flow. Capital gains allow you to make money from a difference in buying and selling price. Basically, you must liquidate a certain asset in order to gain money. For cash flow, investors basically receive money every month from an investment without working for it. One example would be cash flow.

As capital gains investments are affected by wild market swings, they are more of a gamble despite the fact that they can rake in more money in the short term. In contrast, cash flow investments provide steady and stable passive income over a long period of time and you can easily reinvest the money elsewhere to gain more cash flow.

Given the rapid pace of change today, investors must invest for both cash flow and capital gains, with greater emphasis however placed on cash flow investments. This is because money today is a currency and must move to an asset that increases cash flow to prevent losing value to inflation.

Also, investing for cash flow takes most risk out of investments because even if asset prices fall, the investor still receives his passive income monthly. However, if the price of asset increases, you get a bonus! This is much safer than capital gains investments.

In stocks, the cash flow investments available would be dividend stocks. A rule of thumb to remember is that a dividend yield exceeding 5% would be a good stock while that below 3% would mean that the stock is over-priced, suggesting an eventual dip in prices.

If many people knew this general rule, they would not have fallen prey to traps in the market during October 2007 and March 2009. In October 2007, the stock market hit a high of 14,564 with only 1.8% dividend yield. Using the rule, it would have meant that stocks are too expensive and investors shouldn’t enter. Nonetheless, many did not know this and entered the market during this time, causing heavy losses.

To make things worse, history simply repeated in March 2009 when the stock market hit a low of 6,547 with 1.9% dividend yield. This also meant that prices were too high but nevertheless, many people thought prices were low and entered the market. Here, they lost money once again.

In conclusion, given the repetition of such gaffes, it is definitely vital that schools guide their students well on knowing cash flow and capital gains investing well. This would definitely groom them into more financially literate individuals with more means of contributing back to society.…